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Tannin structure

Take a close look at this diagram showing the structure of a tannin molecule. There will be a test tomorrow.

Table wine
The term table wine usually refers to a simple or low-quality wine. Sometimes it refers to an unfortified wine in constrast to a fortified wine such as Sherry.

Tannin
Tannins are a group of compounds found in grape seeds, skins, and stems. Theymay also be added by aging a wine in oak barrels, especially small, new oak barrels. Tannins are the essential component of a red wine’s structure, and are essential for successful aging during which they soften and smooth. Overly predominant tannins may ruin a wine’s taste. Technically tannins are called phenolic compounds.
Tartaric acid
Tartaric acid is a naturally occurring grape. It may crystallize when the wine chills. These flavorless, tasteless crystals are usually removed to avoid offending consumers.
Terroir
While terroir literally means "soil" in French, as used by wine lovers, French or not, it refers to the entire winemaking environment. Some translate it as somewhereness, the sum of local characteristics that make a specific region that region. In some parts of the world, the terroir may vary from one end of the vineyard to the other.
Toasting
Toasting chars the insides of new or almost new barrels over an open flame. This process caramelizes the wood, adding vanillin and other aromas and tastes to the wine.
Topping up
Topping up a barrel or other container means adding wine to replace losses via evaporation. This process prevents oxidation. Topping up a glass means adding wine to keep it relatively full. This process may speed consumption.
      
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