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Noble Rot on Riesling grapes

I have seen many pictures of Noble Rot and this one is the least disgusting that I have ever seen. Perhaps these grapes aren't ready to be harvested.

New World
From the perspective of wine, the New World includes North and South America, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, and perhaps Central and Eastern Europe. New World countries are not necessarily new to wine making; California, for example, has been making wine for centuries. Because winemaking is international, the distinction between New World and Old World wines is blurring.
Noble Rot
Noble Rot is a fungal infection caused by Botrytis Cinerea. Noble Rot in essence sucks water from affected grapes, producing shriveled, moldy grapes that turn your stomach to look at, and lead to some of the world’s best dessert wines, including French Sauternes and Hungarian Tokaji Aszú. The conditions must be just right, the grape must be the right varieties such as Semillon and Sauvignon Blanc. The climatic conditions must also be just right: damp, misty mornings followed by warm, sunny afternoons or else instead of Noble Rot, the grapes undergo Grey Rot, they simply rot.
Nouveau
Nouveau, the French word for new, refers to wines that are the first products of the harvest. The best known nouveau vin (wine) is Beaujolais Nouveau, traditionally released to the public on the fourth Thursday of November. Nouveau wines are fruity and easy to drink. They should be enjoyed within months of their release.
      
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